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image: Estimating Epigenetic Mutation Rates

Estimating Epigenetic Mutation Rates

By | May 11, 2015

Generation-spanning maps of Arabidopsis thaliana DNA methylation allow researchers to compute how quickly epigenetic marks appear and disappear in the plant’s genome.

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image: New Epigenetic Mark Found on Metazoan DNA

New Epigenetic Mark Found on Metazoan DNA

By | April 30, 2015

Three studies identify roles for N6-methyladenosine in algae, worms, and flies.

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image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

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image: CRISPR–Enabled Epigenome Editing

CRISPR–Enabled Epigenome Editing

By | April 6, 2015

Researchers apply the genome-editing technology to alter histones at distant gene enhancers, controlling gene expression.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

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image: Female Brain Maintained by Methylation

Female Brain Maintained by Methylation

By | March 30, 2015

Development of female sexual behaviors requires DNA methylation in the preoptic area of the rodent brain. 

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image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: Weiwei Dang: Epigenetics in Aging

Weiwei Dang: Epigenetics in Aging

By | March 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Huffington Center On Aging, Baylor College of Medicine. Age: 38

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image: How We Age

How We Age

By | March 1, 2015

From DNA damage to cellular miscommunication, aging is a mysterious and multifarious process.

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