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» epigenetics and developmental biology

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image: Finding Injury

Finding Injury

By | September 1, 2012

The brain’s phagocytes follow an ATP bread trail laid down by calcium waves to the site of damage.

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image: Flu Fights Dirty

Flu Fights Dirty

By | September 1, 2012

Mimicking a host-cell histone protein offers flu a sneaky tactic to suppress immune response.

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image: Blood Spots Are Epigenetic Time Capsules

Blood Spots Are Epigenetic Time Capsules

By | August 22, 2012

Researchers show that blood spotted onto Guthrie cards, usually at birth, can be a high quality source of methylated DNA for long-term epigenetic studies.

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image: Boosting Antipsychotic Drugs

Boosting Antipsychotic Drugs

By | August 5, 2012

Chemicals that change the way DNA is packaged could improve the effects of current antipsychotics.

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image: Space-bound Fish

Space-bound Fish

By | July 31, 2012

Japanese astronauts deliver an aquarium to the International Space Station to study the effects of microgravity on marine life.

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image: Early Epigenetic Influence

Early Epigenetic Influence

By | July 16, 2012

Random chance, plus small differences in uterine environments, give rise to divergent epigenetic patterns in identical twins.

8 Comments

image: DNA Methylation Linked to Memory Loss

DNA Methylation Linked to Memory Loss

By | July 2, 2012

Scientists find that declining DNA methylation in mouse neurons may cause age-related memory deficits.

5 Comments

image: DNA Methylation Declines with Age

DNA Methylation Declines with Age

By | June 11, 2012

Newborns carry more epigenetic markers than nonagenarians, providing clues to the mechanisms underlying aging.

7 Comments

image: Grading on the Curve

Grading on the Curve

By | June 1, 2012

Actin filaments respond to pressure by forming branches at their curviest spots, helping resist the push.

5 Comments

image: Growing Human Eggs

Growing Human Eggs

By | June 1, 2012

Germline stem cells discovered in human ovaries can be cultured into fresh eggs.

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