The Scientist

» epigenetics and disease/medicine

Most Recent

image: Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Show Signs of Donor Age

Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Show Signs of Donor Age

By | December 12, 2016

iPSCs created through the reprogramming of human somatic cells retain genomic marks of the donor’s age.

0 Comments

image: Oligonucleotide Therapeutics Near Approval

Oligonucleotide Therapeutics Near Approval

By | December 1, 2016

Successful late-stage clinical trials could mark the maturation of a new drug development platform, but the path to commercialization is not without hurdles.

0 Comments

image: How Diet Influences Host-Microbiome Communication in Mice

How Diet Influences Host-Microbiome Communication in Mice

By | November 23, 2016

Researchers are beginning to decipher the metabolic language of the microbiome, and determine how gut microbes communicate with host tissue.

0 Comments

image: More than 40 New Papers on Epigenetics Published

More than 40 New Papers on Epigenetics Published

By | November 22, 2016

The International Human Epigenome Consortium presents a series of studies on how epigenetics influences immunity, cell lineage determination, and differentiation.

0 Comments

image: More Success Fixing Sickle Cell Gene with CRISPR

More Success Fixing Sickle Cell Gene with CRISPR

By | November 9, 2016

Researchers say they have sufficient in vitro and animal data to apply for human testing.

0 Comments

Family members with a certain gene variant had unnecessary interventions, highlighting the potential hazards of precision medicine.

2 Comments

image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | October 24, 2016

Virus’s effect on RNA methylation; identifying brain cells targeted by Zika; virus found in vaginal secretions for two weeks after infection; updated CDC recommendations for Miami

0 Comments

image: Nixing NETs to Prevent Metastasis

Nixing NETs to Prevent Metastasis

By | October 19, 2016

Researchers discover that neutrophil extracellular traps help cancers spread, and design enzyme-loaded nanoparticles to destroy them.

1 Comment

Once implanted in mice, the edited stem cells produced normal hemoglobin.

0 Comments

image: Pet Meds Adapted from Human Therapies

Pet Meds Adapted from Human Therapies

By | October 1, 2016

Companies focused on developing treatments for dogs, cats, and horses are bringing a diverse array of products to the pet medicine market.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe
    Daily News UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe

    The European Patent Office will grant patent rights over the use of CRISPR in all cell types to a University of California team, contrasting with a recent decision in the U.S.

  2. DNA Replication Errors Contribute to Cancer Risk
  3. Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?
    Daily News Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?

    With its announced launch of a whole-exome sequencing service for apparently healthy individuals, Ambry Genetics is the latest company to enter this growing market. But whether these services are useful for most people remains up for debate.  

  4. Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target
    Daily News Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target

    The results of a CRISPR-Cas9 study suggest that MELK—a protein thought to play a critical role in cancer—is not necessary for cancer cell survival.

Business Birmingham