The Scientist

» epigenetics, ecology and developmental biology

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Contributors

By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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Parallel Plagues

By | April 1, 2016

Like cancer, ecological scourges result from the breakdown of regulatory processes, and may be treated with similar logic.

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image: Obesity, Diabetes, and Epigenetic Inheritance

Obesity, Diabetes, and Epigenetic Inheritance

By | March 14, 2016

Disease risk can be transmitted epigenetically via egg and sperm cells, a mouse study shows.

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A study suggests bats in Asia could have genes that protect them from the fungal infection that is decimating bat populations in North America.

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Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Aging Shrinks Chromosomes

Aging Shrinks Chromosomes

By | February 5, 2016

A study on human cells reveals how cellular aging affects the 3-D architecture of chromosomes.

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Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

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Keep Off the Grass

By | February 1, 2016

Ecologists focused on grasslands urge policymakers to keep forestation efforts in check.

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image: Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

By | February 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Age: 37

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