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A study suggests bats in Asia could have genes that protect them from the fungal infection that is decimating bat populations in North America.

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Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Aging Shrinks Chromosomes

Aging Shrinks Chromosomes

By | February 5, 2016

A study on human cells reveals how cellular aging affects the 3-D architecture of chromosomes.

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Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

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Keep Off the Grass

By | February 1, 2016

Ecologists focused on grasslands urge policymakers to keep forestation efforts in check.

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image: Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

By | February 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Age: 37

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image: Epigenetic Alterations Determine Ant Behavior

Epigenetic Alterations Determine Ant Behavior

By | January 4, 2016

Histone modifications to the DNA of Florida carpenter ants can turn soldiers into foragers.

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All Together Now

By | January 1, 2016

Understanding the biological roots of cooperation might help resolve some of the biggest scientific challenges we face.

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image: Christie Fowler: Addicted to Research

Christie Fowler: Addicted to Research

By | January 1, 2016

Assistant Professor, Department of Neurobiology and Behavior University of California, Irvine. Age: 39

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Contributors

By | January 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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