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image: Antidepressant Exerts Epigenetic Changes

Antidepressant Exerts Epigenetic Changes

By | November 25, 2015

Molecular markers could aid researchers’ assessment of patient response to the drug.  

4 Comments

image: Weight's the Matter?

Weight's the Matter?

By | November 1, 2015

The causes and consequences of obesity are more complicated than we thought.  

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image: Buzzed Honeybees

Buzzed Honeybees

By | October 20, 2015

Caffeinated nectar makes bees more loyal to a food source, even when foraging there is suboptimal.

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image: Tethering Transposons

Tethering Transposons

By | October 15, 2015

Panoramix, a newly identified transcription repressor, takes the bounce out of jumping genes.

1 Comment

image: Epigenetic Marks Tied to Homosexuality

Epigenetic Marks Tied to Homosexuality

By | October 8, 2015

In a small study of male twins, nine methylation sites helped researchers predict a person’s sexual orientation.

1 Comment

image: One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

By | October 6, 2015

A global assessment of declining cacti populations places responsibility on increasing human activities.

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image: Opinion: Engineering the Epigenome

Opinion: Engineering the Epigenome

By , , and | August 26, 2015

The use of targetable chromatin modifiers has ushered in a new era of functional epigenomics.

1 Comment

image: Butterflies in Peril

Butterflies in Peril

By | August 12, 2015

Several recent studies point to serious—and mysterious—declines in butterfly numbers across the globe.

5 Comments

image: Leaving an Imprint

Leaving an Imprint

By | August 1, 2015

Among the first to discover epigenetic reprogramming during mammalian development, Wolf Reik has been studying the dynamics of the epigenome for 30 years.

1 Comment

image: Messages in the Noise

Messages in the Noise

By | August 1, 2015

After spending more than a decade developing tools to study patterns in gene sequences, bioinformaticians are now working on programs to analyze epigenomics data.

0 Comments

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