The Scientist

» epigenetics and ecology

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image: Killer Kittens

Killer Kittens

By | January 31, 2013

Domestic cats kill billions of birds and mammals every year, making them a top threat to US wildlife.

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image: Modeling All Life?

Modeling All Life?

By | January 28, 2013

A proposal to simulate all of Earth’s ecosystems is exposing a rift between small and big ecology.

5 Comments

image: Cities Affect Global Weather Currents

Cities Affect Global Weather Currents

By | January 28, 2013

The heat emanating from large metropolitan areas may be changing weather patterns thousands of miles away.

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image: The Making of a Bully

The Making of a Bully

By | January 25, 2013

Adolescent rats exposed to stress grow into pathologically aggressive adults, behaviors that may be explained by accompanying epigenetic changes and altered brain activity.

5 Comments

image: Fly Guts Reveal Animal Inventory

Fly Guts Reveal Animal Inventory

By | January 7, 2013

Stomachs of flesh-eating flies carry the DNA of animals in remote rainforests.

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image: Can Epigenetics Explain Homosexuality?

Can Epigenetics Explain Homosexuality?

By | January 1, 2013

Scientists propose a new model for how homosexuality develops, but observers say it will be difficult to test.

14 Comments

image: Fighting Microbes with Microbes

Fighting Microbes with Microbes

By | January 1, 2013

Doctors turn to good microbes to fight disease. Will the same strategy work with crops?

6 Comments

image: Limber LIMS

Limber LIMS

By | January 1, 2013

Using laboratory information management systems (LIMS) to automate and streamline laboratory tasks: three case studies

1 Comment

image: Inherited Resistance to Cocaine

Inherited Resistance to Cocaine

By | December 17, 2012

Cocaine-using rat fathers pass epigenetic changes on to their sons that make them resistant to coke addiction.

5 Comments

image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

1 Comment

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