The Scientist

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image: Aging Shrinks Chromosomes

Aging Shrinks Chromosomes

By | February 5, 2016

A study on human cells reveals how cellular aging affects the 3-D architecture of chromosomes.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

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image: Keep Off the Grass

Keep Off the Grass

By | February 1, 2016

Ecologists focused on grasslands urge policymakers to keep forestation efforts in check.

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image: Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

By | February 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Age: 37

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image: Epigenetic Alterations Determine Ant Behavior

Epigenetic Alterations Determine Ant Behavior

By | January 4, 2016

Histone modifications to the DNA of Florida carpenter ants can turn soldiers into foragers.

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image: All Together Now

All Together Now

By | January 1, 2016

Understanding the biological roots of cooperation might help resolve some of the biggest scientific challenges we face.

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image: Christie Fowler: Addicted to Research

Christie Fowler: Addicted to Research

By | January 1, 2016

Assistant Professor, Department of Neurobiology and Behavior University of California, Irvine. Age: 39

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Contributors

By | January 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Telomerase Overdrive

Telomerase Overdrive

By | January 1, 2016

Two mutations in a gene involved in telomere extension reverse the gene’s epigenetic silencing.

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image: RNA Epigenetics

RNA Epigenetics

By , , and | January 1, 2016

DNA isn’t the only decorated nucleic acid in the cell. Modifications to RNA molecules are much more common and are critical for regulating diverse biological processes.

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