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image: Newest Life Science Additions to the Dictionary

Newest Life Science Additions to the Dictionary

By | February 8, 2017

Need help explaining CRISPR, epigenome, or rock snot? The Merriam-Webster dictionary has you covered.

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image: Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

By | February 8, 2017

Researchers employ an engineered microbe to destroy tumor cells in mice.

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image: How Plants Evolved to Eat Meat

How Plants Evolved to Eat Meat

By | February 7, 2017

Pitcher plants across different continents acquired their tastes for meat in similar ways.

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image: Discovering Novel Antibiotics

Discovering Novel Antibiotics

By | February 1, 2017

Three methods identify and activate silent bacterial gene clusters to uncover new drugs

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image: In Praise of McClintock

In Praise of McClintock

By | February 1, 2017

Robert Martienssen, who studies plant epigenetics at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, discusses the brilliance of pioneering geneticist Barbara McClintock, with whom he worked before her death in 1992.

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image: Plants’ Epigenetic Secrets

Plants’ Epigenetic Secrets

By | February 1, 2017

Unlike animals, plants stably pass on their DNA methylomes from one generation to the next. The resulting gene silencing likely hides an abundance of phenotypic variation.

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image: Infographic: Plant Methylation Basics

Infographic: Plant Methylation Basics

By | February 1, 2017

Multiple molecular mechanisms keep plant DNA methylation in order.

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image: Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

By | January 31, 2017

These millimeter-size sea creatures lived 540 million years ago.

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Study of 81 six-week-olds who were born by C-section or vaginal delivery didn’t show differences in the structure or function of their microbiota, despite contrary results from other studies on babies. 

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Using simulations, scientists report that a mixture of termites and plant competition may be responsible for the strange patterns of earth surrounded by plants in the Namib desert. 

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