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image: Opinion: Think Like Turing

Opinion: Think Like Turing

By | October 22, 2012

Biomedical researchers would benefit from emulating the logically rigorous reasoning of the late Alan Turing, British mathematician, computer scientist, and master cryptographer.

2 Comments

image: Biologist Ruffles Feathers on Facebook

Biologist Ruffles Feathers on Facebook

By | October 19, 2012

The blogosphere voices widespread condemnation for a sexist comment made by a researcher attending this week’s annual Society for Neuroscience conference.

8 Comments

image: Epigenetic Enigmas

Epigenetic Enigmas

By | October 17, 2012

Overturning previous studies, a peculiar protozoan mysteriously uses a DNA-markup system to take out the genetic trash.   

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Singing about Science

Opinion: Singing about Science

By | October 4, 2012

Music videos could be helpful tools for science communication and education, but anti- and pseudoscience activists are also using this medium to spread their views.

1 Comment

image: The Best of the 2012 Labbies

The Best of the 2012 Labbies

By | October 1, 2012

Check out image finalists and winners, as well as other memorable submissions to this year’s Labby Multimedia Awards.

0 Comments

image: The Salinella salve Mystery

The Salinella salve Mystery

By | October 1, 2012

Salinella salve, an organism described as a single layer of cells, ciliated on both inner and outer surfaces and surrounding…

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Living Color</em>

Book Excerpt from Living Color

By | October 1, 2012

In Chapter 3, "Out of the Tropics," author Nina G. Jablonski, explores the genes behind skin pigmentation and makes the distinction between color and race.

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Contributors

October 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Gone Missing, circa 1892

Gone Missing, circa 1892

By | October 1, 2012

A unique organism sighted only once, more than a century ago, could shed light on the evolution of multicellularity—if it ever actually existed.

3 Comments

image: Home Cookin’

Home Cookin’

By | October 1, 2012

Laboratory-raised populations of dung beetles reveal a mother's extragenetic influence on the physiques of her sons.

2 Comments

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