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image: Week in Review: July 7–11

Week in Review: July 7–11

By | July 11, 2014

Assessing mtDNA mutations among healthy people; heritability of intelligence; epigenetic inheritance of maternal malnutrition markers; consumers buy into DNA ancestry

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image: Gestational Malnutrition Affects Offspring’s Sperm

Gestational Malnutrition Affects Offspring’s Sperm

By | July 10, 2014

Mice undernourished during pregnancy can transmit the effects of such nutritional stress to their sons’ germ cells, epigenetically.  

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image: Inherited Intelligence

Inherited Intelligence

By | July 10, 2014

Cognitive testing in chimpanzee pedigrees reveals a genetic basis for intelligence.

4 Comments

image: Lichen Legion

Lichen Legion

By | July 2, 2014

Genetic analysis splits one species into 126.

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image: The Rise of Color

The Rise of Color

By | July 1, 2014

An analysis of modern birds reveals that carotenoid-based plumage coloring arose several times throughout their evolutionary history, dating as far back as 66 million years ago.

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image: Carnal Knowledge

Carnal Knowledge

By | July 1, 2014

Sex is an inherently fascinating aspect of life. As researchers learn more and more about it, surprises regularly emerge.

2 Comments

image: Geni-Tales

Geni-Tales

By | July 1, 2014

Penises and vaginas are not just simple sperm delivery and reception organs. They have been perfected by eons of sexual conflict.  

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image: Size Matters

Size Matters

By | July 1, 2014

The disproportionately endowed carabid beetle reveals that the size of female—and not just male—genitalia influences insemination success.

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image: The Sex Paradox

The Sex Paradox

By | July 1, 2014

Birds do it. Bees do it. We do it. But not without a physical, biochemical, and genetic price. How did the costly practice of sex become so commonplace?

13 Comments

image: Sly Guys

Sly Guys

By | July 1, 2014

Across the animal kingdom, dominance isn’t the only way for a male to score. Colluding, sneaking around, or cross-dressing can work, too.

1 Comment

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