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image: RNA Epigenetics

RNA Epigenetics

By , , and | January 1, 2016

DNA isn’t the only decorated nucleic acid in the cell. Modifications to RNA molecules are much more common and are critical for regulating diverse biological processes.

8 Comments

image: RNA Methylation Dynamics

RNA Methylation Dynamics

By , , and | January 1, 2016

Additions to the bases of RNA molecules can be written, read, and erased.

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image: Week in Review: November 30–December 4

Week in Review: November 30–December 4

By | December 4, 2015

Historic meeting on human gene editing; signs of obesity found in sperm epigenome; top 10 innovations of 2015; dealing with retractions

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image: Obesity Alters Sperm Epigenome

Obesity Alters Sperm Epigenome

By | December 3, 2015

Moderately obese men display different epigenetic marks on their sperm than lean men, and bariatric surgery in massively obese men correlated with changes in sperm methylation.

1 Comment

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | December 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Ghosts in the Genome

Ghosts in the Genome

By | December 1, 2015

How one generation’s experience can affect the next

4 Comments

image: Antidepressant Exerts Epigenetic Changes

Antidepressant Exerts Epigenetic Changes

By | November 25, 2015

Molecular markers could aid researchers’ assessment of patient response to the drug.  

4 Comments

image: Weight's the Matter?

Weight's the Matter?

By | November 1, 2015

The causes and consequences of obesity are more complicated than we thought.  

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image: Tethering Transposons

Tethering Transposons

By | October 15, 2015

Panoramix, a newly identified transcription repressor, takes the bounce out of jumping genes.

1 Comment

image: Epigenetic Marks Tied to Homosexuality

Epigenetic Marks Tied to Homosexuality

By | October 8, 2015

In a small study of male twins, nine methylation sites helped researchers predict a person’s sexual orientation.

1 Comment

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