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image: Culturing Changes Cells

Culturing Changes Cells

By | February 3, 2015

Within days of their transfer to a dish, a certain epigenetic mark vanishes from mouse cells.

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image: Methylation Predicts Mortality

Methylation Predicts Mortality

By | February 3, 2015

A study finds a link between patterns of methylation in the human genome and people’s life span.

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image: Pushing the Limits

Pushing the Limits

By | February 1, 2015

A guide to the newest techniques for examining epigenetics in single cells

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image: Performance Art

Performance Art

By | January 1, 2015

Regulation of genome expression orchestrates the behavior of insect castes and the human response to social stress.

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image: Upside of Early-Life Stress?

Upside of Early-Life Stress?

By | November 18, 2014

Mice raised under stressful conditions are more adaptable as adults—and may pass this trait on to their pups.

1 Comment

image: CRISPR Pioneers Honored

CRISPR Pioneers Honored

By | November 18, 2014

Influential researchers receive the 2015 Breakthrough Prizes in Life Sciences.

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image: Week in Review: October 13–17

Week in Review: October 13–17

By | October 17, 2014

Snail not extinct after all; results too good to be true?; mice need myelin production for motor learning; keeping the brain young; the evolution of archaea

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image: Epigenetics Paper Raises Questions

Epigenetics Paper Raises Questions

By | October 16, 2014

GENETICS publishes a commentary criticizing a Nature Neuroscience paper claiming that mice can inherit smell sensitivities that their parents acquired during life.

5 Comments

image: Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

By | September 25, 2014

Documenting the epigenetic landscape of human innate immune cells reveals pathways essential for training macrophages.

2 Comments

image: Heritable Histones

Heritable Histones

By | September 18, 2014

Scientists show how roundworm daughter cells remember the histone modification patterns of their parents.

3 Comments

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