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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Serengeti Rules</em>

Book Excerpt from The Serengeti Rules

By | April 1, 2016

In the introduction to the book, author Sean B. Carroll draws the parallels between ecological and physiological maladies.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2016

Lab Girl, The Most Perfect Thing, Half-Earth, and Cosmosapiens

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | April 1, 2016

April 2016's selection of notable quotes

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image: Minimal Genome Created

Minimal Genome Created

By | March 24, 2016

Scientists build a living cellular organism with a genome smaller than any known in nature.

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image: Book Review: <em>Personal Trials</em>

Book Review: Personal Trials

By | March 22, 2016

At first blush, do-it-yourself clinical trials seem pointless and reckless. But a deeper truth pervades the research and the patients who drive it forward.

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image: The 2016 Salary Survey Is Here

The 2016 Salary Survey Is Here

By | March 18, 2016

Answer some brief questions and help us determine the most current salary outlook for life scientists and earn a chance to win a $100 Amazon gift card.

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image: Brains Before Brawn

Brains Before Brawn

By | March 16, 2016

A newly described horse-size relative of Tyrannosaurus rex may help settle the question of how massive carnivorous dinosaurs took shape throughout the eons.

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image: Less Chewing, More Doing

Less Chewing, More Doing

By | March 11, 2016

Food processing in early hominid populations might have played a key role in human evolution by increasing net energy uptake, researchers show.

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image: Student Fights Harassment with Wikipedia

Student Fights Harassment with Wikipedia

By | March 10, 2016

Every time Emily Temple-Wood receives an inappropriate email, she writes a Wikipedia entry about a woman scientist.

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image: Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

By | March 3, 2016

Endogenous retroviruses in the human genome can regulate genes involved in innate immune responses.

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