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image: Aging Shrinks Chromosomes

Aging Shrinks Chromosomes

By | February 5, 2016

A study on human cells reveals how cellular aging affects the 3-D architecture of chromosomes.

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image: Reveling in the Revealed

Reveling in the Revealed

By | January 1, 2016

A growing toolbox for surveying the activity of entire genomes

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image: Chromatin Conformation Computed

Chromatin Conformation Computed

By | October 19, 2015

By manipulating DNA sequences that guide genome-folding, researchers confirm an existing model of chromatin structure inside the nucleus.

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image: Crystal Unclear

Crystal Unclear

By | October 15, 2015

A behind-the-scenes look at how researchers solved the high-resolution crystal structure of the nucleosome core particle raises the age-old question of assigning credit in science.

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image: DNA Loop-the-Loops

DNA Loop-the-Loops

By | December 11, 2014

A new full-genome map indicates how DNA is folded within the nuclei of human cells.

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image: Going Long

Going Long

By | April 1, 2014

Researchers discover a tool to trigger an uncommon strategy cancer cells can use to lengthen their telomeres.

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image: Karmella Haynes: Turning the Dials

Karmella Haynes: Turning the Dials

By | December 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Arizona State University. Age: 36

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image: Loss of Potential

Loss of Potential

By | June 1, 2013

In the fruit fly, the ability of neural stem cells to make the full repertoire of neurons is regulated by the movement of key genes to the nuclear periphery.

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image: Conserved Chromatin?

Conserved Chromatin?

By | December 10, 2012

Archaea packages DNA around histones in a similar way to eukaryotes, suggesting that fitting a large genome into a small space was not the original role of chromatin.

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image: How Stress is Inherited

How Stress is Inherited

By | July 1, 2011

Under stressful conditions, a transcription factor in flies turns on genes by releasing its hold on tightly wound DNA, a new study suggests.

18 Comments

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