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image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.


image: Spinning Clinical Trials

Spinning Clinical Trials

By | January 16, 2013

Results of breast cancer drug trials are regularly spun to conceal bias and make the drugs seem more effective or less toxic than they really are.


image: A Dime a Dozen

A Dime a Dozen

By | January 1, 2013

Affordable diagnostic tests tackle the world’s most pressing health problems.


image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.


image: Contributors


By | November 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2012 issue of The Scientist.


image: Exit Strategy

Exit Strategy

By | November 1, 2012

Large RNA-protein packets use a novel mechanism to escape the cell nucleus.


image: Long and Rocky Roads

Long and Rocky Roads

By | November 1, 2012

From basic research to beneficial therapies


image: Eggs Trade Genes

Eggs Trade Genes

By | October 24, 2012

Swapping chromosomes from one human egg to another could eliminate mitochondrial DNA mutations that cause disease.


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