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Frisky Fruit Flies

By | November 5, 2013

Researchers show that Drosophila females upregulate an immune gene for protection against sexually transmitted infections before copulation.

1 Comment

image: Salary Stats

Salary Stats

By | November 1, 2013

Surprising trends reveal themselves in this year's Salary Survey statistics.

0 Comments

image: 2013 Life Sciences Salary Survey

2013 Life Sciences Salary Survey

By | November 1, 2013

The Scientist opened up its annual Salary Survey to our international readers for the first time, revealing stark differences between average pay in the U.S., Europe, and the rest of the world.

9 Comments

image: It’s in the Genes

It’s in the Genes

By | October 24, 2013

Researchers find strong correlations between the composition of the human microbiome and genetic variation in immune-related pathways.

4 Comments

image: Drug Widens Immunity to Flu

Drug Widens Immunity to Flu

By | October 20, 2013

An immune suppressive drug can unexpectedly help immunized mice fight off many strains of flu.

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image: Bonding in the Lab

Bonding in the Lab

By | October 1, 2013

How to make your lab less like a factory and more like a family

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Science in the Cities

By | August 20, 2013

California, Texas, and New York are home to more than a quarter of all US scientists and engineers, according to an NSF report.

2 Comments

image: Best Places to Work Academia 2013

Best Places to Work Academia 2013

By | August 1, 2013

Institutional funding and research support is critical to academics during this time of continued budgetary belt-tightening across government agencies.  

4 Comments

image: Week in Review, July 8–12

Week in Review, July 8–12

By | July 12, 2013

Editor accused of fraud leaves post; the good and the bad of gut microbiota; bacterial gene shuffle; legal restrictions hamper illicit drug research; antibodies and autism

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image: Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

By | July 1, 2013

Paul Ehrlich came up with an explanation for cellular interactions based on receptors, earning a Nobel Prize and the title "Father of Modern Immunology"—only to have his theory forgotten.

3 Comments

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