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image: Online Platform Aims to Facilitate Replication Studies

Online Platform Aims to Facilitate Replication Studies

By | April 7, 2017

A volunteer-run database called StudySwap, which launched in beta last month, is starting to gain momentum.  

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image: Scientists Can’t Replicate Gene-Editing Method

Scientists Can’t Replicate Gene-Editing Method

By | November 21, 2016

Even with the original authors’ vector, the NgAgo technique doesn’t work in others’ hands.

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image: TS Picks: March 16, 2016

TS Picks: March 16, 2016

By | March 16, 2016

Corrections give belated credit for immunotherapy; mosquitoes have been bugging us long before Zika; the bright side of irreproducibility 

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image: Reproducibility Crisis Not So Bad?

Reproducibility Crisis Not So Bad?

By | March 7, 2016

Two studies temper the dismal assessment of psychology and economics researchers’ abilities to replicate one another’s experiments.

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image: Study: Transparency Lacking in Biomedical Literature

Study: Transparency Lacking in Biomedical Literature

By | January 4, 2016

Few authors make their full data available and most published papers do not clearly state funding sources and conflicts of interest.

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image: Gambling on Reproducibility

Gambling on Reproducibility

By | November 10, 2015

New research finds that observers placing bets in a stock exchange–like environment are pretty good at predicting the replicability of psychology studies.

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image: STAP Author Can’t Replicate Results

STAP Author Can’t Replicate Results

By | December 22, 2014

RIKEN’s Haruko Obokata fails to replicate stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency.

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image: The Rules of Replication

The Rules of Replication

By | November 1, 2014

Should there be standard protocols for how researchers attempt to reproduce the work of others?

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image: Fact or Artifact?

Fact or Artifact?

By | October 29, 2014

A study documenting the ubiquity of DNA contamination calls into question a recent paper on food-derived nucleic acids in the human bloodstream.

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