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image: New Bird Flu Threat?

New Bird Flu Threat?

By | February 4, 2014

Chinese officials report the first two human cases of H10N8 avian influenza, one of which is linked to the death of a 73-year-old woman.

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image: Microbial Smog

Microbial Smog

By | February 3, 2014

Some 1,300 species of microbes, including some associated with allergies and lung disease, are adrift in Beijing’s thick smog.

4 Comments

image: Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

By | February 2, 2014

Without microglia to pluck off unwanted synapses in early life, mouse brains develop with weaker connections, leading to altered social behavior.

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image: An Offensive Playbook

An Offensive Playbook

By | February 1, 2014

Developing nonaddictive drugs to combat pain

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2014

Me, Myself, and Why, RedDevil 4, Neanderthal Man, and Science from Sight to Insight

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Fly on a String

Fly on a String

By | February 1, 2014

Fruit flies are fixed to a silica fiber in this new technique to aid neuroscientists in performing laser surgery prior to neuroimaging.

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image: On Race and Medicine

On Race and Medicine

By | February 1, 2014

Until health care becomes truly personalized, race and ethnicity will continue to be important clues guiding medical treatments.

2 Comments

image: Single Neuron-Imaging Bot

Single Neuron-Imaging Bot

By | February 1, 2014

New technology probes the functional unit of nervous transmission.

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image: Brains in Action

Brains in Action

By | February 1, 2014

Neuroscientists are automating neural imaging and recording, allowing them to monitor increasingly large swaths of the brain in living, behaving animals.  

2 Comments

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