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Ancient Sex

By | October 19, 2014

Fossils of an extinct, armored fish challenge current understanding of when copulation and internal fertilization evolved in jawed vertebrates.

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Neuro-Insights into Holding It

By | October 17, 2014

Scientists reveal the neural underpinnings—and muscles tightly linked with—the involuntary flexing of the pelvic floor, which comprises muscles that help us delay urination.

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image: Week in Review: October 13–17

Week in Review: October 13–17

By | October 17, 2014

Snail not extinct after all; results too good to be true?; mice need myelin production for motor learning; keeping the brain young; the evolution of archaea

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image: Myelin’s Role in Motor Learning

Myelin’s Role in Motor Learning

By | October 16, 2014

The production of new myelin in the brain—a function of non-neuronal glial cells—may be necessary for motor learning, a mouse study shows.

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image: Turning Back the Brain’s Clock

Turning Back the Brain’s Clock

By | October 15, 2014

The brain’s ability to make new neural connections can be restored in mice by blocking a protein that normally acts as a natural brake on neuroplasticity. 

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image: New Genes = New Archaea?

New Genes = New Archaea?

By | October 15, 2014

Genes acquired from bacteria contributed to the origins of archaeal lineages, a large-scale phylogenetic analysis suggests.

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Modified Yeast Tolerate Alcohol, Heat

By | October 2, 2014

Simple changes help yeast thrive in the presence of their own harmful byproducts and could boost biofuel production.

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Chimp Culture Caught on Camera

By | October 1, 2014

Researchers have captured footage of wild chimpanzees teaching each other to use tools, lending support to the idea that humans aren’t the only primates to engage in social learning.

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image: An Eye for Detail

An Eye for Detail

By | October 1, 2014

Vision researcher John Dowling has spent a lifetime studying the neural architecture of the retina. He is closing his laboratory after 53 years, opting to extend these studies as a postdoc.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Unnatural Selection</em>

Book Excerpt from Unnatural Selection

By | October 1, 2014

In chapter 5, “Resurgence: Bedbugs Bite Back,” author Emily Monosson chronicles the rise of the pesky pests in the face of humanity’s best chemical efforts.

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