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image: The A@#hole Scientist

The A@#hole Scientist

By | February 1, 2013

Can a vexing sense of entitlement actually aid in the pursuit of knowledge?

15 Comments

image: Why Insects Should Be in Your Diet

Why Insects Should Be in Your Diet

By | February 1, 2013

Because of their high protein and fat content and their reproductive efficiency, insects hold great promise for thwarting an impending global food crisis.

15 Comments

image: Opinion: Communication Crisis in Research

Opinion: Communication Crisis in Research

By | January 30, 2013

The problem threatens progress and stems from both a lack of attention to clear discourse and a scientific culture not focused on critical challenges.

9 Comments

image: Opinion: The Successes of Women in STEM

Opinion: The Successes of Women in STEM

By | January 23, 2013

Women have come a long way, but roadblocks remain

1 Comment

image: Genetic Deodorant

Genetic Deodorant

By | January 18, 2013

People carrying a certain gene variant that dictates fresh underarms are less likely to wear antiperspirant.

1 Comment

image: Universal Flu Vaccines Charge Ahead

Universal Flu Vaccines Charge Ahead

By | January 14, 2013

Researchers and biotech companies are bringing a universal flu vaccine closer to reality.

0 Comments

image: It’s Elementary

It’s Elementary

By | January 10, 2013

Maria Konnikova says the field of psychology has something to learn from great works of fiction.

3 Comments

image: Deaf Mice Hear Again

Deaf Mice Hear Again

By | January 10, 2013

A drug applied to the ears of deaf mice has prompted the regrowth of noise-damaged hair cells and resulted in slight improvements in the animals’ hearing.

1 Comment

image: Lab Safety in the Spotlight

Lab Safety in the Spotlight

By | January 4, 2013

An international survey suggests that labs may not be safe as researchers think.

1 Comment

image: Book Excerpt from The Dawn of the Deed

Book Excerpt from The Dawn of the Deed

By | January 1, 2013

In the final chapter of his book on the origins of vertebrate sex, author and paleontologist John Long pays homage to the humble placoderm, which got the erotic ball rolling.

0 Comments

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