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image: Week in Review: January 27–31

Week in Review: January 27–31

By | January 31, 2014

Stimulus-triggered pluripotency; antioxidants speed lung tumor growth; the importance of seminal vesicles; how a plant pathogen jumps hosts

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image: More than Sperm Support

More than Sperm Support

By | January 27, 2014

Male mice lacking seminal vesicles father fewer offspring, and their sons suffer from abnormal metabolism into adulthood.

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image: Week in Review: January 20–24

Week in Review: January 20–24

By | January 24, 2014

Mistimed sleep disrupts human transcriptome; canine tumor genome; de novo Drosophila genes; UVA light lowers blood pressure; aquatic microfauna fight frog-killing fungus

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image: Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

By | January 20, 2014

Injection of microscopic particles of a plastic-like material protects mice from cardiac tissue damage following heart attack.

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image: Toxin Wipes Out Persistent HIV

Toxin Wipes Out Persistent HIV

By | January 10, 2014

An antibody-toxin combo kills residual HIV hiding out in the organs of mice.

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image: Common Lab Mice Differ

Common Lab Mice Differ

By | January 8, 2014

Related substrains of the Black 6 lab mouse carry key genetic polymorphisms, including one that has a dramatic effect on the rodents’ responses to cocaine.

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image: Fiber-Rich Diet Cuts Asthma in Mice

Fiber-Rich Diet Cuts Asthma in Mice

By | January 7, 2014

Scientists show that fiber’s influence on gut microbes affects the lungs’ response to allergens.

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image: Bacterial Persisters

Bacterial Persisters

By | January 1, 2014

A bacterial gene shuts down the cell's own protein synthesis, which sends the bacterium into dormancy and allows it to outlast antibiotics.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | January 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: The Bright Side of Prions

The Bright Side of Prions

By | January 1, 2014

Associated with numerous neurological diseases, misfolded proteins may also play decisive roles in normal cellular functioning.  

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Mettler Toledo
BD Biosciences
BD Biosciences