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image: Quick and Cheap Zika Detection

Quick and Cheap Zika Detection

By | May 3, 2017

A heat block, a truck battery, and a novel RNA amplification assay make for in-the-field surveillance of the virus.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Flavor</em>

Book Excerpt from Flavor

By | May 1, 2017

Author Bob Holmes dove into the taste-determining realm of his genome.

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image: Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

By | May 1, 2017

One person’s quest to get to the bottom of the unique way he experiences food

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | May 1, 2017

Climate change, research funding, race, and much more

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Studies of infected rhesus monkeys reveal the virus’s long-term hiding places in the body.

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image: Image of the Day: Placental Array

Image of the Day: Placental Array

By | April 26, 2017

Placentas from mice with genetically distinct immune systems, stained to highlight differences in three proteins, representing the nucleus (blue), blood vessels (red), and trophoblasts (green)

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image: An Epigenetic Aging Clock for Mice

An Epigenetic Aging Clock for Mice

By | April 21, 2017

Scientists predict rodents’ ages by assessing DNA methylation markers in various tissues.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Hitting It Out of the Park

Hitting It Out of the Park

By | April 1, 2017

Cancer can be as evasive and slippery as a spitball, but new immunotherapies are starting to connect.

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image: Location, Location, Location

Location, Location, Location

By | April 1, 2017

Since first proposing that a cell’s function and biology depend on its surroundings, Mina Bissell continues to probe the role of the extracellular matrix.

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