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image: Telomere Basics

Telomere Basics

By | May 1, 2012

Telomeres are repetitive, noncoding sequences that cap the ends of linear chromosomes. They consist of hexameric nucleotide sequences (TTAGGG in humans) repeated hundreds to thousands of times. 

4 Comments

image: From Squeaks to Song

From Squeaks to Song

By | May 1, 2012

House mice sing melodies out of the range of human hearing, and the crooning is impacting research from evolutionary biology to neuroscience.

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image: Telomeres in Disease

Telomeres in Disease

By | May 1, 2012

Telomeres have been linked to numerous diseases over the years, but how exactly short telomeres cause diseases and how medicine can prevent telomere erosion are still up for debate.

16 Comments

image: Building a Better Sheep

Building a Better Sheep

By | April 25, 2012

Chinese scientists claim to have cloned a lamb carrying a roundworm gene that aids in the production of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

6 Comments

image: Stem Cell Researcher Fabricates Data

Stem Cell Researcher Fabricates Data

By | April 16, 2012

A scientist who claimed to have injected monkey embryonic stem cells into the eyes of rats to improve their vision accepts the penalty for research misconduct.

8 Comments

image: Plant RNA Paper Questioned

Plant RNA Paper Questioned

By | April 16, 2012

Remarkable findings of ingested plant miRNA in animal liver and blood draw speculation about the study’s validity.

42 Comments

image: Identifying Diet-Treatable Diseases

Identifying Diet-Treatable Diseases

By | April 10, 2012

Scientists test which mutations underlie metabolic diseases that may benefit from changes in diet.

6 Comments

image: News from Cancer Meeting

News from Cancer Meeting

By | April 4, 2012

A roundup of recent research announced this week at the annual conference of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR).

4 Comments

image: Lab Studies Lie about the Clock

Lab Studies Lie about the Clock

By | April 4, 2012

Fly circadian behavior is dramatically different in natural environments than in the lab.

10 Comments

image: A Malignant Alliance

A Malignant Alliance

By | April 1, 2012

Two proteins interact to save adhesion molecules from degradation, potentially contributing to a more aggressive cancer.

2 Comments

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