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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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image: How Zika Infects Mother and Baby

How Zika Infects Mother and Baby

By | August 25, 2016

The virus replicates in the vaginal tissue of pregnant mice and in the brains of their fetuses, researchers show.

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Disrupting the light/dark cycles of pregnant mice, researchers observe detrimental effects in the mouths of the animals’ pups.

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image: Nose Bacterium Inhibits <em>S. aureus</em> Growth

Nose Bacterium Inhibits S. aureus Growth

By | July 27, 2016

A study on microbe versus microbe battles within the human nose yields a new antibiotic.

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image: A Blood Test To Determine When Antibiotics Are Warranted

A Blood Test To Determine When Antibiotics Are Warranted

By | July 7, 2016

Scientists can assay gene activity to distinguish between bacterial and viral infections.

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image: Sex Differences in Immune Response

Sex Differences in Immune Response

By | June 21, 2016

Female mice lacking an immune receptor are better than males at fighting certain viral infections.

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image: Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

By | June 6, 2016

European perch larvae exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of polystyrene particles preferred to eat the microplastics in place of prey, according to a study.

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image: Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

By | June 1, 2016

From whole cells to genes, closer examination continues to surprise.  

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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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