The Scientist

» insects, microbiology and neuroscience

Most Recent

Zebra finches dial down dopamine signaling when they hear errors in a song performance.

0 Comments

image: Singing In the Brain

Singing In the Brain

By | March 1, 2017

His first love was dance, but Erich Jarvis has long courted another love—understanding how the brain learns vocalization.

0 Comments

image: Understanding the Roots of Human Musicality

Understanding the Roots of Human Musicality

By | March 1, 2017

Researchers are using multiple methods to study the origins of humans’ capacity to process and produce music, and there’s no shortage of debate about the results.

0 Comments

image: Infographic: Mapping Musicality

Infographic: Mapping Musicality

By | March 1, 2017

Huge areas of the brain respond to any sort of auditory stimulus, making it difficult for scientists to nail down regions that are important for music processing.

0 Comments

image: Infographic: Taking Note of Singing Errors

Infographic: Taking Note of Singing Errors

By | March 1, 2017

Birds' brains respond to distorted songs with changes in dopamine signaling.

0 Comments

image: From Cricket Choruses to <em>Drosophila</em> Calls

From Cricket Choruses to Drosophila Calls

By | March 1, 2017

A handful of insect species communicate using auditory signals—sounds that researchers have dubbed “song.”

0 Comments

image: Meeting BRAMS

Meeting BRAMS

By | March 1, 2017

Visit the International Laboratory for Brain, Music and Sound Research, located in Montreal, to see the research seeking to decipher humans’ relationship to music.

0 Comments

image: Song of Ourselves

Song of Ourselves

By | March 1, 2017

“Nature’s melodies” may be a human construct that says more about us than about the musicality of other animals.

0 Comments

image: How Bacteria Interfere with Insect Reproduction

How Bacteria Interfere with Insect Reproduction

By | February 28, 2017

Scientists identify the genes responsible for bacteria-controlled sterility in arthropods.

1 Comment

The 23-year-old neuroscience graduate student, born in Saudi Arabia and raised in numerous countries, came to the U.S. as a teenager to attend college.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

AAAS