The Scientist

» insects, immunology and developmental biology

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image: Insect Wing Kills Bacteria

Insect Wing Kills Bacteria

By | March 6, 2013

The nanoscale structure of a clanger cicada’s wings destroys threatening microbes on contact.


image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.


image: Antibody-Dependent Enhanced (ADE) Immunity

Antibody-Dependent Enhanced (ADE) Immunity

By | March 2, 2013

The method to the dengue virus's maddening infectiousness.


image: Bacterial Buddies

Bacterial Buddies

By | March 1, 2013

A chance encounter with a crab apple tree leads to the discovery of a new bacterial species and clues to the evolution of insect endosymbionts.


image: Contributors


By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.


image: Bedeviled by Dengue

Bedeviled by Dengue

By | March 1, 2013

The global spread of dengue virus has immunologists and public-health experts debating the best way to curb infection.


image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.


image: Do Mice Make Bad Models?

Do Mice Make Bad Models?

By | February 11, 2013

A study suggests that some mouse models do not accurately mimic human molecular mechanisms of inflammatory response, but other mouse strains may fare better.


image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | February 6, 2013

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research


image: New TB Vaccine Fails Trial

New TB Vaccine Fails Trial

By | February 4, 2013

One of the most advanced tuberculosis vaccines has failed to protect infants from getting the disease in a clinical trial, but it may be effective in adults.

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