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» insects, immunology and evolution

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image: The Bug Zoo

The Bug Zoo

By | July 6, 2012

A Canadian menagerie lets visitors get up close and personal with insects to help make crawlies less creepy.

4 Comments

image: Meet the Bugs

Meet the Bugs

By | July 6, 2012

The Victoria Bug Zoo is extremely small. In 1997, the Zoo's founder, Carol Maier, started the collection, which now includes more than 50 insect species, after completing her entomology degree from the University of Guelph. 

0 Comments

image: Mass Extinctions Set the Pace

Mass Extinctions Set the Pace

By | July 4, 2012

The rate of evolution is affected for millenia after mass extinctions.

6 Comments

image: Opinion: One Microbe’s 15 Minutes

Opinion: One Microbe’s 15 Minutes

By | July 3, 2012

The recently hyped amoeba-flagellate Collodictyon has many secrets to tell about early eukaryotic evolution.

2 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2012

Evolving, The Moral Molecule, Aping Mankind, and Experiment Eleven

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | July 1, 2012

July 2012's selection of notable quotes

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image: The First Australopithecus, 1925

The First Australopithecus, 1925

By | July 1, 2012

The discovery of the 2.5-million-year-old Taung Child skull marked a turning point in the study of human brain evolution.

2 Comments

image: Ubiquitin Chains in Action

Ubiquitin Chains in Action

By | July 1, 2012

Present in every tissue of the body, ubiquitin appears to be involved in a dizzying array of functions, from cell cycle and division to organelle and ribosome biogenesis, as well as the response to viral infection. The protein plays at least two role

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image: Sweet Smell of Success

Sweet Smell of Success

By | July 1, 2012

With persistence and pluck, Leslie Vosshall managed to snatch insect odorant receptors from the jaws of experimental defeat.

2 Comments

image: Five Mutations Make H5N1 Airborne

Five Mutations Make H5N1 Airborne

By | June 21, 2012

The second of the two controversial bird flu papers is published in Science, revealing that just five mutations can render the virus transmissible between ferrets.

3 Comments

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