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image: Mini-Metagenomics Leads to Microbial Discovery

Mini-Metagenomics Leads to Microbial Discovery

By | July 14, 2017

Researchers develop a method that combines the strengths of shotgun metagenomics and single-cell genome sequencing in a microfluidics-based platform.

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image: Anti-CRISPR Protein Reduces Off-Target Effects

Anti-CRISPR Protein Reduces Off-Target Effects

By | July 12, 2017

AcrIIA4, an inhibitor protein from the Listeria bacteriophage, can block DNA from binding to Cas9 during genome editing.

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image: Caterpillars Turn to Cannibalism: Study

Caterpillars Turn to Cannibalism: Study

By | July 10, 2017

Herbivores may take to omnivory and eat conspecifics when the plants they feed on produce unsavory protective chemicals.

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image: RNA Protects “Naked” Genomes from Retrotransposons

RNA Protects “Naked” Genomes from Retrotransposons

By | June 30, 2017

Transfer RNA fragments prevent jumping genes from hopping around in the mouse embryo, when histone methylation can’t do the job.

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image: Field Studies Confirm Neonicotinoids’ Harm to Bees

Field Studies Confirm Neonicotinoids’ Harm to Bees

By | June 29, 2017

Two large studies find that, in real-world conditions, the insecticides are detrimental to honey bees and bumblebees.

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The cell-surface receptor, SIRP-alpha, initiates the innate immune response in hosts.  

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The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium aims to characterize the entire mouse genome, starting first with more than 3,300 genes. 

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An analysis of human cancer genome projects uncovers a counterintuitive loss of ribosomal gene copies.

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image: T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

By | June 20, 2017

Overzealous activity by mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in response to bacterial toxins can lead to illness instead of stopping it.

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By spreading a poison and hoarding the remedy, wtf4 improves its chances of being inherited. 

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