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image: Doodoo Rendezvous

Doodoo Rendezvous

By | July 1, 2014

Watch flightless dung beetles (Circellium bacchus), sneaky copulators and crap connoisseurs, do their thing in South Africa.

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image: Going Beyond the Lab

Going Beyond the Lab

By | July 1, 2014

Scientists who study the biological roots of sexual orientation should continue working with educators, policy-makers, and the public to put their data to good use.

10 Comments

image: Sex and Drugs

Sex and Drugs

By | July 1, 2014

Did 20th-century pharmaceutical and technological advances shape modern sexual behaviors?

2 Comments

image: Speaking of Sex

Speaking of Sex

By | July 1, 2014

July 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Love Bug

The Love Bug

By | July 1, 2014

A mysterious iridovirus outbreak in a lab colony of crickets reveals the virus’s ability to spur increased sexual activity.

1 Comment

image: To Study Unfettered

To Study Unfettered

By | July 1, 2014

Researching the causes of sexual orientation should be guided by scientific, not social, concerns.

5 Comments

image: Review: “What Lies Beneath”

Review: “What Lies Beneath”

By | June 23, 2014

An exhibit at the newly opened SciArt Center in New York City showcases work that explores hidden worlds.

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image: Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

By | June 22, 2014

ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: June 16–20

Week in Review: June 16–20

By | June 20, 2014

Early Neanderthal evolution; developing antivirals to combat polio; the mouth and skin microbiomes; insect-inspired, flight-stabilizing sensors

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image: Insect-Inspired Sensors Improve Tiny Robot’s Flight

Insect-Inspired Sensors Improve Tiny Robot’s Flight

By | June 18, 2014

Microroboticists have designed simple sensors based on insect light organs called ocelli to stabilize a miniature flying robot.

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