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An experiment in which people pass each other initially nonrhythmic drumming sequences reveals the human affinity for musical patterns.

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image: From Cricket Choruses to <em>Drosophila</em> Calls

From Cricket Choruses to Drosophila Calls

By | March 1, 2017

A handful of insect species communicate using auditory signals—sounds that researchers have dubbed “song.”

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image: Song of Ourselves

Song of Ourselves

By | March 1, 2017

“Nature’s melodies” may be a human construct that says more about us than about the musicality of other animals.

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image: How Bacteria Interfere with Insect Reproduction

How Bacteria Interfere with Insect Reproduction

By | February 28, 2017

Scientists identify the genes responsible for bacteria-controlled sterility in arthropods.

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image: Cannibalism: Not That Weird

Cannibalism: Not That Weird

By | February 1, 2017

Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

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image: Image of the Day: Creepy Crawlers

Image of the Day: Creepy Crawlers

By | January 30, 2017

Scientists discover the alien-like Aethiocarenus burmanicus, a 100 million-year old insect with a triangular head and bulging eyes.

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image: Unique Antibodies Open Path Toward New HIV Vaccines

Unique Antibodies Open Path Toward New HIV Vaccines

By | January 27, 2017

A family of broadly neutralizing antibodies from a chronically infected donor provides a schematic for designing vaccines and treatments that target multiple strains of the virus.

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image: Image of the Day: Trump Bug

Image of the Day: Trump Bug

By | January 19, 2017

Inspired by President-elect Donald Trump's signature hairdo, a biologist named a new species of moth with yellowish-white scales on its head Neopalpa donaldtrumpi.

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image: Image of the Day: Pretty in Pink

Image of the Day: Pretty in Pink

By | January 12, 2017

Females of a newly discovered katydid species (Eulophophyllum kirki) have a unique pink hue.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Testosterone Rex</em>

Book Excerpt from Testosterone Rex

By | January 1, 2017

In Chapter 6, “The Hormonal Essence of the T-Rex?” author Cordelia Fine considers the biological dogma that testes, and the powerful hormones they exude, are the root of all sexual inequality.

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