The Scientist

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image: Contributors


By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.


image: Parallel Plagues

Parallel Plagues

By | April 1, 2016

Like cancer, ecological scourges result from the breakdown of regulatory processes, and may be treated with similar logic.


A study suggests bats in Asia could have genes that protect them from the fungal infection that is decimating bat populations in North America.


image: Dragonfly is World-Record Flier

Dragonfly is World-Record Flier

By | March 3, 2016

Researchers have determined that a diminutive insect out-flies all other winged migrators by traveling thousands of miles between continents and across oceans yearly.

1 Comment

image: Migrating Monarch Numbers Rebound

Migrating Monarch Numbers Rebound

By | March 1, 2016

The iconic butterflies have flocked to their Mexican overwintering grounds, seemingly reversing recent population declines.


image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

1 Comment

image: Keep Off the Grass

Keep Off the Grass

By | February 1, 2016

Ecologists focused on grasslands urge policymakers to keep forestation efforts in check.


image: Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

By | February 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Age: 37


image: Owl Be Darned

Owl Be Darned

By | December 4, 2015

Researchers studying city-dwelling birds are learning about which animals are more suited to urban life.

1 Comment

image: A Rainforest Chorus

A Rainforest Chorus

By | December 1, 2015

Researchers measure the health of Papua New Guinea’s forests by analyzing the ecological soundscape.


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