The Scientist

» insects, evolution and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Image of the Day: Fly Eyes

Image of the Day: Fly Eyes

By | March 10, 2017

The robber fly (Holcocephala fusca) has a highly sensitive visual system, which can detect prey up to 100 body lengths away.

0 Comments

“Buena vista” hypothesis suggests that changes in the sizes of eyes, rather than a shift from fins to limbs, led fish to transition to land more than 300 million years ago.  

1 Comment

Researchers report growing a mouse embryo using two types of early stem cells.

0 Comments

image: Tune Into the Animal Kingdom

Tune Into the Animal Kingdom

By | March 1, 2017

A survey of sounds from birds to whales to fruit flies to fish

2 Comments

image: Understanding the Roots of Human Musicality

Understanding the Roots of Human Musicality

By | March 1, 2017

Researchers are using multiple methods to study the origins of humans’ capacity to process and produce music, and there’s no shortage of debate about the results.

0 Comments

image: From Cricket Choruses to <em>Drosophila</em> Calls

From Cricket Choruses to Drosophila Calls

By | March 1, 2017

A handful of insect species communicate using auditory signals—sounds that researchers have dubbed “song.”

0 Comments

image: Song of Ourselves

Song of Ourselves

By | March 1, 2017

“Nature’s melodies” may be a human construct that says more about us than about the musicality of other animals.

0 Comments

image: How Bacteria Interfere with Insect Reproduction

How Bacteria Interfere with Insect Reproduction

By | February 28, 2017

Scientists identify the genes responsible for bacteria-controlled sterility in arthropods.

1 Comment

image: Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

By | February 17, 2017

A computer algorithm can identify the brains of autism patients with moderate accuracy based on scans taken at six months and one year of age.

0 Comments

image: Ancient Marine Reptile Birthed Live Young

Ancient Marine Reptile Birthed Live Young

By | February 15, 2017

Researchers have described a pregnant Dinochephalosaurus, and the fossilized remains suggest that the massive animal did not lay eggs, as previously suspected.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

AAAS