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image: Gene Drive’s Achilles Heel

Gene Drive’s Achilles Heel

By | May 22, 2017

Rare genetic variants could blunt efforts to destroy pest populations. 

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image: Image of the Day: Smells like Royalty

Image of the Day: Smells like Royalty

By | May 8, 2017

Indian jumping ants, Harpegnathos saltator, can identify future queens based on a pheromone produced by the royal larvae.

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image: Sweet Trick, Hawkmoths

Sweet Trick, Hawkmoths

By | April 17, 2017

The fast-flying insects convert sugars from nectar into antioxidants, which can help heal the oxidative damage suffered by their hard-working muscles.

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image: Image of the Day: Fly Eyes

Image of the Day: Fly Eyes

By | March 10, 2017

The robber fly (Holcocephala fusca) has a highly sensitive visual system, which can detect prey up to 100 body lengths away.

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image: Tune Into the Animal Kingdom

Tune Into the Animal Kingdom

By | March 1, 2017

A survey of sounds from birds to whales to fruit flies to fish

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image: From Cricket Choruses to <em>Drosophila</em> Calls

From Cricket Choruses to Drosophila Calls

By | March 1, 2017

A handful of insect species communicate using auditory signals—sounds that researchers have dubbed “song.”

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image: Song of Ourselves

Song of Ourselves

By | March 1, 2017

“Nature’s melodies” may be a human construct that says more about us than about the musicality of other animals.

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image: How Bacteria Interfere with Insect Reproduction

How Bacteria Interfere with Insect Reproduction

By | February 28, 2017

Scientists identify the genes responsible for bacteria-controlled sterility in arthropods.

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image: Image of the Day: Creepy Crawlers

Image of the Day: Creepy Crawlers

By | January 30, 2017

Scientists discover the alien-like Aethiocarenus burmanicus, a 100 million-year old insect with a triangular head and bulging eyes.

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image: Image of the Day: Trump Bug

Image of the Day: Trump Bug

By | January 19, 2017

Inspired by President-elect Donald Trump's signature hairdo, a biologist named a new species of moth with yellowish-white scales on its head Neopalpa donaldtrumpi.

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