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image: Bacteria by Design

Bacteria by Design

By | January 30, 2014

A survey of bacteria in a University of Oregon building reveals that architecture influences the indoor microbiome.


image: Week in Review: January 20–24

Week in Review: January 20–24

By | January 24, 2014

Mistimed sleep disrupts human transcriptome; canine tumor genome; de novo Drosophila genes; UVA light lowers blood pressure; aquatic microfauna fight frog-killing fungus


image: <em>Drosophila</em>’s New Genes

Drosophila’s New Genes

By | January 23, 2014

An analysis of the transcriptomes of several fruit fly strains reveals dozens of possible de novo genes in each.


image: Contagious Dog Cancer Sequenced

Contagious Dog Cancer Sequenced

By | January 23, 2014

A dog tumor that became a free-living parasite picked up myriad mutations, but has since stabilized.


image: More than Calcium

More than Calcium

By | January 22, 2014

Ancient DNA analysis suggests that calcium and vitamin D deficiencies were not the only reasons that may have driven Neolithic Iberian people to drink milk.


image: Moths Are a Sloth’s Best Friend

Moths Are a Sloth’s Best Friend

By | January 22, 2014

Scientists propose that the three-toed sloth’s risky bathroom behavior is governed by mutualisms with moths and algae.


image: Week in Review: January 13–17

Week in Review: January 13–17

By | January 17, 2014

Debating the origins of placental mammals; H. pylori-human coevolution; ant, bee, and wasp queens emit similar pheromones; profiling protein expression in single cancer cells


image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | January 16, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research


image: Gut Microbes Prevent Locust Swarms

Gut Microbes Prevent Locust Swarms

By | January 15, 2014

Migratory locusts are less likely to aggregate into crop-devastating swarms when infected by the parasite Paranosema locustae.


image: Human-Pathogen Coevolution

Human-Pathogen Coevolution

By | January 13, 2014

Helicobacter pylori strains that share ancestry with their human hosts are less likely to cause severe disease.


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