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image: How, If, and Why Species Form

How, If, and Why Species Form

By , , and | November 1, 2013

Biologists have struggled for centuries to properly define what constitutes a “species.” They may have been asking the wrong question—many smaller organisms might not form species at all.

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image: Salary Stats

Salary Stats

By | November 1, 2013

Surprising trends reveal themselves in this year's Salary Survey statistics.

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image: Some Nerve

Some Nerve

By | November 1, 2013

The neuron-inspired art of erstwhile neuroscientist Greg Dunn

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | November 1, 2013

November 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: 2013 Life Sciences Salary Survey

2013 Life Sciences Salary Survey

By | November 1, 2013

The Scientist opened up its annual Salary Survey to our international readers for the first time, revealing stark differences between average pay in the U.S., Europe, and the rest of the world.

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image: Snakes on a Visual Plane

Snakes on a Visual Plane

By | October 28, 2013

Researchers detect neurons in the macaque brain that selectively respond to images of reptilian predators.

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image: Gifts During Sex Matter After

Gifts During Sex Matter After

By | October 28, 2013

Female spiders prefer sperm from males with gifts, a study shows.

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image: Week in Review: October 21–25

Week in Review: October 21–25

By | October 25, 2013

PubMed launches Commons; measuring HIV’s latent reservoir; immune-related pathway variation in genome, microbiome; rapamycin and flu vaccines; grasshopper mice resistant to pain

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image: Evolving Pain Resistance

Evolving Pain Resistance

By | October 24, 2013

Grasshopper mice harbor mutations in a pain-transmitting sodium channel that allow them to prey on highly toxic bark scorpions.

2 Comments

image: Opinion: Academic Waste

Opinion: Academic Waste

By | October 17, 2013

From funding to publishing, academic research needlessly burns through time and money.

3 Comments

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