The Scientist

» evolutionary biology and culture

Most Recent

image: Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

By | May 4, 2016

Contrary to the popular thought that many species are “unculturable,” the majority of bacteria known to populate the human gut can be grown in the lab, scientists show.

0 Comments

In the book's prologue, author Frans de Waal considers the intellectual impediments to studying animal intelligence.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2016

Sorting the Beef from the Bull, Cheats and Deceits, A Sea of Glass, and Following the Wild Bees

0 Comments

image: Feeling Around in the Dark

Feeling Around in the Dark

By | May 1, 2016

Scientists work to unlock the genetic secrets of a population of fruit flies kept in total darkness for more than six decades.

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | May 1, 2016

May 2016's selection of notable quotes

0 Comments

image: The Global Science Era

The Global Science Era

By | May 1, 2016

As international collaboration becomes increasingly common, researchers must work to limit their own biases and let cultural diversity enhance their work.

2 Comments

image: The Zombie Literature

The Zombie Literature

By | May 1, 2016

Retractions are on the rise. But reams of flawed research papers persist in the scientific literature. Is it time to change the way papers are published?

9 Comments

image: To Each Animal Its Own Cognition

To Each Animal Its Own Cognition

By | May 1, 2016

The study of nonhuman intelligence is coming into its own as researchers realize the unique contexts in which distinct species learn and behave.

3 Comments

image: Revered Biologist Dies

Revered Biologist Dies

By | April 27, 2016

Rick Harrison, an evolutionary biologist known for his research on speciation, has passed away at age 70.

0 Comments

image: Tracking Zika’s Evolution

Tracking Zika’s Evolution

By | April 15, 2016

Sequence analysis of 41 viral strains reveals more than a half-century of change. 

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Authors Peeved by APA’s Article Takedown Pilot
  3. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  4. Was a Drop in CRISPR Firms’ Stock Warranted?
AAAS