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image: Contagious Dog Cancer Sequenced

Contagious Dog Cancer Sequenced

By | January 23, 2014

A dog tumor that became a free-living parasite picked up myriad mutations, but has since stabilized.

8 Comments

image: More than Calcium

More than Calcium

By | January 22, 2014

Ancient DNA analysis suggests that calcium and vitamin D deficiencies were not the only reasons that may have driven Neolithic Iberian people to drink milk.

4 Comments

image: Moths Are a Sloth’s Best Friend

Moths Are a Sloth’s Best Friend

By | January 22, 2014

Scientists propose that the three-toed sloth’s risky bathroom behavior is governed by mutualisms with moths and algae.

0 Comments

image: Week in Review: January 13–17

Week in Review: January 13–17

By | January 17, 2014

Debating the origins of placental mammals; H. pylori-human coevolution; ant, bee, and wasp queens emit similar pheromones; profiling protein expression in single cancer cells

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | January 16, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Human-Pathogen Coevolution

Human-Pathogen Coevolution

By | January 13, 2014

Helicobacter pylori strains that share ancestry with their human hosts are less likely to cause severe disease.

3 Comments

image: Week in Review: January 6–10

Week in Review: January 6–10

By | January 10, 2014

Bacterial genes aid tubeworm settling; pigmentation of ancient reptiles; nascent neurons and vertebrate development; exploring simple synapses; slug-inspired surgical glue

0 Comments

image: Bacterial Persisters

Bacterial Persisters

By | January 1, 2014

A bacterial gene shuts down the cell's own protein synthesis, which sends the bacterium into dormancy and allows it to outlast antibiotics.

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | January 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: The Bright Side of Prions

The Bright Side of Prions

By | January 1, 2014

Associated with numerous neurological diseases, misfolded proteins may also play decisive roles in normal cellular functioning.  

6 Comments

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