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image: More than Calcium

More than Calcium

By | January 22, 2014

Ancient DNA analysis suggests that calcium and vitamin D deficiencies were not the only reasons that may have driven Neolithic Iberian people to drink milk.

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image: Moths Are a Sloth’s Best Friend

Moths Are a Sloth’s Best Friend

By | January 22, 2014

Scientists propose that the three-toed sloth’s risky bathroom behavior is governed by mutualisms with moths and algae.

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image: Person-to-Person H7N9?

Person-to-Person H7N9?

By | January 20, 2014

The death of a medical worker in China prompts worries that the virus can spread between humans.

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image: Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

By | January 20, 2014

Injection of microscopic particles of a plastic-like material protects mice from cardiac tissue damage following heart attack.

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image: Next Generation: Capturing the Body’s Energy

Next Generation: Capturing the Body’s Energy

By | January 20, 2014

Researchers build a device that harvests and stores energy from the mechanical movements of a beating heart.

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image: Week in Review: January 13–17

Week in Review: January 13–17

By | January 17, 2014

Debating the origins of placental mammals; H. pylori-human coevolution; ant, bee, and wasp queens emit similar pheromones; profiling protein expression in single cancer cells

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image: Gene Therapy Improves Sight

Gene Therapy Improves Sight

By | January 17, 2014

Patients progressing toward blindness now have better vision after a gene therapy trial.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | January 16, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Human-Pathogen Coevolution

Human-Pathogen Coevolution

By | January 13, 2014

Helicobacter pylori strains that share ancestry with their human hosts are less likely to cause severe disease.

3 Comments

image: Week in Review: January 6–10

Week in Review: January 6–10

By | January 10, 2014

Bacterial genes aid tubeworm settling; pigmentation of ancient reptiles; nascent neurons and vertebrate development; exploring simple synapses; slug-inspired surgical glue

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