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Running Wild

By | May 22, 2014

Mice in nature appear to enjoy running on wheels, helping to settle the question whether the behavior is a just a neurotic response in lab mice.

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image: Week in Review: May 12–16

Week in Review: May 12–16

By | May 16, 2014

Antidepressant could prevent Alzheimer’s plaques; 12,000-year-old human skeleton sequenced; disentangling the mystery of octopus arms; taking a look at the ocular microbiome

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image: Ancient Skeleton Sheds Light on Native American Roots

Ancient Skeleton Sheds Light on Native American Roots

By | May 15, 2014

Analysis of approximately 12,000-year-old human remains supports the idea that modern Native Americans evolved from ancestors who migrated out of Asia.

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Back from the Blacklist?

By | May 8, 2014

Disgraced psychology researcher Marc Hauser, who was found guilty of data fabrication and falsification during his time at Harvard, publishes two new papers.

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image: Rock Snot Explained

Rock Snot Explained

By | May 8, 2014

An increasingly common algal growth, found in rivers the world over, is caused by changing environmental conditions, not accidental introductions.

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Finch-Powered Fumigation

By | May 7, 2014

Darwin’s finches use pesticide-treated cotton to line their nests and unwittingly protect themselves against parasitic fly larvae.

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Not So Different

By | May 1, 2014

Researchers unearth little evidence to suggest modern humans are superior to their Neanderthal ancestors.

4 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2014

Madness and Memory, Promoting the Planck Club, The Carnivore Way, and The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons

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image: A Wilder Europe

A Wilder Europe

By | May 1, 2014

An organization hopes to restore natural ecological processes by reintroducing large herbivores to the continent.

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image: Where the Wild Things Were

Where the Wild Things Were

By | May 1, 2014

Conservationists are reintroducing large animals to areas they once roamed, providing ecologists with the chance to assess whether such “rewilding” efforts can restore lost ecosystems.

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