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image: The Promise of Nanomedicine

The Promise of Nanomedicine

By | April 8, 2014

At AACR, scientists discuss the growing interest in nanotechnology and how it can be used to study, diagnose, and treat cancer.

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image: DARPA Puts Biotech at the Fore

DARPA Puts Biotech at the Fore

By | April 4, 2014

The U.S. Department of Defense is solidifying its focus on the life sciences with a new division of biotechnology.  

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image: Dermatologically Derived

Dermatologically Derived

By | April 1, 2014

Inspired by turkey skin, researchers devise a bacteriophage-based sensor whose color changes upon binding specific molecules.

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image: Gut Microbes Gobble Cocoa

Gut Microbes Gobble Cocoa

By | March 19, 2014

Commensal bacteria that populate the human gastrointestinal tract help digest dark chocolate, releasing anti-inflammatory compounds, researchers report.

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image: Biotech Superstar Dies

Biotech Superstar Dies

By | March 7, 2014

Alejandro Zaffaroni, who launched companies that developed birth control pills, microarrays, and transdermal drug patches, has died at age 91.  

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image: Week in Review: March 3–7

Week in Review: March 3–7

By | March 7, 2014

The gene behind a butterfly’s mimicry; the evolution of adipose fins; bacteria and bowel cancer; plants lacking plastid genomes

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image: Bacteria’s Role in Bowel Cancer

Bacteria’s Role in Bowel Cancer

By | March 3, 2014

The development of serrated polyps depends on bacteria present in the gut, a mouse study shows.  

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image: Early Evidence

Early Evidence

By | March 1, 2014

Fossilized structures suggest that mat-forming microbes have been around for almost 3.5 billion years.

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image: A Wine Bacterium’s Proteome

A Wine Bacterium’s Proteome

By | February 26, 2014

Scientists map the partial proteome of a common lactic acid bacterium.

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image: How a Microbe Resists Its Own Antibiotics

How a Microbe Resists Its Own Antibiotics

By | February 20, 2014

Researchers reveal the molecular mechanisms of Streptomyces platensis’s defense from its own antibiotics, which inhibit fatty acid synthesis in other microbes.

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