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image: Taking Shots at Ebola

Taking Shots at Ebola

By | November 5, 2014

With an infusion of public and private resources and accelerated regulatory processes, a handful of companies are racing to develop a vaccine to curb the Ebola epidemic.

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image: Poor Little Devils

Poor Little Devils

By | November 1, 2014

See the devastating infectious cancer that may drive the Tasmanian Devil to extinction.

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image: Nurse Infected with Ebola in Spain

Nurse Infected with Ebola in Spain

By | October 6, 2014

The case marks the first person to contract the virus outside of West Africa.

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image: Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

By | September 25, 2014

Documenting the epigenetic landscape of human innate immune cells reveals pathways essential for training macrophages.

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image: The Second Coming of RNAi

The Second Coming of RNAi

By | September 1, 2014

Now showing clinical progress against liver diseases, the gene-silencing technique begins to fulfill some of its promises.

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image: A Matter of Size

A Matter of Size

By | August 1, 2014

Erroneous characterization of nanomaterials can misinform the study of a new medicine’s safety and efficacy.

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image: Nanomedicine

Nanomedicine

By , and | August 1, 2014

From bioimaging to drug delivery and therapeutics, nanotechnology is poised to change the way doctors practice medicine.

10 Comments

image: Done with Immunosuppressants

Done with Immunosuppressants

By | July 3, 2014

Adult sickle-cell patients have safely stopped taking their immunosuppressant medication thanks to a new type of blood stem-cell transplant.

2 Comments

image: Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

By | June 22, 2014

ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.

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image: Ancient Apoptosis

Ancient Apoptosis

By | June 9, 2014

Humans and coral share a cell-death pathway that has been conserved between them for more than half a billion years.

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