The Scientist

» biotechnology and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Taking Shots at Ebola

Taking Shots at Ebola

By | November 5, 2014

With an infusion of public and private resources and accelerated regulatory processes, a handful of companies are racing to develop a vaccine to curb the Ebola epidemic.

4 Comments

image: Nurse Infected with Ebola in Spain

Nurse Infected with Ebola in Spain

By | October 6, 2014

The case marks the first person to contract the virus outside of West Africa.

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

3 Comments

image: The Second Coming of RNAi

The Second Coming of RNAi

By | September 1, 2014

Now showing clinical progress against liver diseases, the gene-silencing technique begins to fulfill some of its promises.

1 Comment

image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

0 Comments

image: A Matter of Size

A Matter of Size

By | August 1, 2014

Erroneous characterization of nanomaterials can misinform the study of a new medicine’s safety and efficacy.

0 Comments

image: Nanomedicine

Nanomedicine

By , , and | August 1, 2014

From bioimaging to drug delivery and therapeutics, nanotechnology is poised to change the way doctors practice medicine.

10 Comments

image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

0 Comments

image: Autism-Hormone Link Found

Autism-Hormone Link Found

By | June 4, 2014

A study documents boys with autism who were exposed to elevated levels of testosterone, cortisol, and other hormones in utero.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Broad Wins CRISPR Patent Interference Case
    Daily News Broad Wins CRISPR Patent Interference Case

    The USPTO’s Patent Trial and Appeal Board has ruled in favor of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard retaining intellectual property rights covered by its patents for CRISPR gene-editing technology.

  2. Henrietta Lacks’s Family Seeks Compensation
  3. Humans Never Stopped Evolving
    Features Humans Never Stopped Evolving

    The emergence of blood abnormalities, an adult ability to digest milk, and changes in our physical appearance point to the continued evolution of the human race.

  4. Abundant Sequence Errors in Public Databases
Business Birmingham