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Science Loses Two More

By | March 6, 2013

Oncologist Jane C. Wright and physics Nobel-winner Donald Glaser have died.


image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.


image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2013

The Undead, Frankenstein's Cat, The Universe Within, and Physics in Mind

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image: Contributors


By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.


image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.


image: Robo-Eye to Enter US Market

Robo-Eye to Enter US Market

By | February 11, 2013

A retinal prosthesis, already available in Europe, can restore partial sight to people with a genetic disorder that causes blindness.


image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.


image: Pfizer Scientist Dies

Pfizer Scientist Dies

By | January 25, 2013

Genetics researcher and senior vice president of the pharmaceutical giant, David Cox, has passed away unexpectedly at age 66.


image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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