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image: TS Picks: December 30, 2015

TS Picks: December 30, 2015

By | December 30, 2015

Overvaluing startups; undervaluing human research participants; curing aging?

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image: Year in Review: CRISPR Blossoms

Year in Review: CRISPR Blossoms

By | December 16, 2015

As researchers work to improve the precision gene-editing technology, the community discusses the best way to use it.

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image: Another Obesity Drug Trial Death

Another Obesity Drug Trial Death

By | December 2, 2015

A second patient taking an experimental medication to treat Prader-Willi Syndrome has died of blood clots.

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

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image: Imaging Live Tissue Without Fluorescence

Imaging Live Tissue Without Fluorescence

By | October 30, 2015

Modifying a vibration-based optical technique can capture images of living tissues, researchers show. 

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image: Imaging Entire Organisms

Imaging Entire Organisms

By | October 26, 2015

A new microscope allows researchers to watch biological processes at the cellular level in 3-D in living animals. 

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image: Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

By | October 13, 2015

An upcoming clinical trial aims to correct for a disease of fragile bones in affected babies before they are born.

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image: Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

By | October 1, 2015

Four types of gut bacteria found in babies’ stool may help researchers predict the future development of asthma.

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