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image: Donor-Soil Microbes Drive Ecosystem Restoration

Donor-Soil Microbes Drive Ecosystem Restoration

By | July 11, 2016

Excavating existing topsoil and adding donor soil, researchers revitalized degraded farmland in the span of six years.

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Mismatched ancestral origins of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA boost mouse health.

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image: A New Role for Marine Archaea

A New Role for Marine Archaea

By | July 1, 2016

Researchers discover acetogenesis in archaea, suggesting an important role for these little-studied organisms in generating organic carbon below the seafloor.

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image: Archaea’s Role in Carbon Cycle

Archaea’s Role in Carbon Cycle

By | July 1, 2016

Bathyarchaeota undergo acetogenesis, generating organic carbon below the seafloor.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

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image: How High Fat and Insulin Levels May Lead to Diabetes

How High Fat and Insulin Levels May Lead to Diabetes

By | July 1, 2016

Lipids and insulin play important roles in blood sugar regulation, and altered levels of either could kick start metabolic dysfunction.

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image: Marine Bacteria Share Carbon Assimilation Duties

Marine Bacteria Share Carbon Assimilation Duties

By | July 1, 2016

Taxonomic differences in bacterioplankton amino acid uptake

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image: Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

By | July 1, 2016

An experimental evolution study shows that more cheaters arise when bread mold fungal cells are less related to one another.

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image: Peter Tyack: Marine Mammal Communications

Peter Tyack: Marine Mammal Communications

By | July 1, 2016

The University of St. Andrews behavioral ecologist studies the social structures and behaviors of whales and dolphins, recording and analyzing their acoustic communications.

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image: Submerged Pigs Inform Forensics

Submerged Pigs Inform Forensics

By | July 1, 2016

Watching the decomposition of pig carcasses anchored to the seafloor is helping forensic researchers understand what to expect of human remains dumped in the ocean.

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