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image: Fewer Female Snail Penises

Fewer Female Snail Penises

By | January 14, 2014

Researchers are now spotting fewer cases of imposex—in which female sea snails develop male sexual organs—as a result of a chemical ban instituted in 2008.


image: Large Carnivores Under Siege

Large Carnivores Under Siege

By | January 13, 2014

As populations of top predators decline in ecosystems the world over, researchers chart the widespread effects.


image: Caffeine Boosts Memory Consolidation?

Caffeine Boosts Memory Consolidation?

By | January 13, 2014

A new study purports to show that post-learning caffeine consumption can improve memory, but some scientists are not convinced.


image: Week in Review: January 6–10

Week in Review: January 6–10

By | January 10, 2014

Bacterial genes aid tubeworm settling; pigmentation of ancient reptiles; nascent neurons and vertebrate development; exploring simple synapses; slug-inspired surgical glue


image: Nascent Neurons Break Free

Nascent Neurons Break Free

By | January 9, 2014

Neuronal precursors are partially dismantled during early development before they find their fate.  


image: Settlement Signal

Settlement Signal

By | January 9, 2014

A marine bacterium generates contractile structures that are essential for the metamorphosis of a tubeworm.


image: A Ribbeting Tale

A Ribbeting Tale

By | January 1, 2014

A famous frog-hopping contest yields data that challenge previous lab estimates of how far a bullfrog can jump.

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image: Book Excerpt from The Monkey’s Voyage

Book Excerpt from The Monkey’s Voyage

By | January 1, 2014

In Chapter 7, “The Green Web,” author Alan de Queiroz describes the evolutionary journey taken by a South American species of sundew plant.


image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | January 1, 2014

Are Dolphins Really Smart?, Newton's Football, Outsider Scientists, and We Are Our Brains

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image: Evolution’s Stowaways

Evolution’s Stowaways

By | January 1, 2014

Terrestrial mammals, carnivorous plants, and even burrowing reptiles have spread around the globe by braving the seven seas. These chance ocean crossings are rewriting the story of Earth’s biogeography.


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