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image: The Mating Habits of Early Hominins

The Mating Habits of Early Hominins

By | December 18, 2013

A newly sequenced Neanderthal genome provides insight into the sex lives of human ancestors.

3 Comments

image: Herding Cats

Herding Cats

By | December 17, 2013

Examination of bones found in a Chinese village suggests that domesticated felines lived side-by-side with humans 5,300 years ago.

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image: How Bacteria Evade the Immune System

How Bacteria Evade the Immune System

By | December 12, 2013

Escherichia coli can quickly evolve to resist engulfment by macrophages, scientists have found.

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image: A New Basal Animal

A New Basal Animal

By | December 12, 2013

Comb jellies take their place on the oldest branch of the animal family tree.  

4 Comments

image: Wolfish Social Skills

Wolfish Social Skills

By | December 4, 2013

According to a new study, wolves can learn from humans.

1 Comment

image: Bipedal Beginnings

Bipedal Beginnings

By | December 4, 2013

Re-examination of a thigh bone from one of the earliest putative hominins could impact scientists’ understanding of the origins of human bipedalism, a study suggests.

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image: Star Scientists Align

Star Scientists Align

By | December 3, 2013

While scientific output has suffered in evolutionary biology departments, individual researchers are churning out more than ever, thanks in part to geographically distant collaborations.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Accidental Species</em>

Book Excerpt from The Accidental Species

By | December 1, 2013

In Chapter 7, “The Way We Walk,” author Henry Gee describes the first steps taken by the ancestors of Homo sapiens.

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image: Standing Up for Sex

Standing Up for Sex

By | December 1, 2013

Humans evolved the ability to walk on two legs because it allowed them to more accurately size up prospective mates. Or did they?

8 Comments

image: Weathering the Storm

Weathering the Storm

By | December 1, 2013

How to prepare your lab for natural disasters and cope with unavoidable consequences

1 Comment

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