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image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: WHO: Ramp Up Vaccination

WHO: Ramp Up Vaccination

By | March 23, 2015

The World Health Organization is calling for an increase in routine vaccinations for measles and other preventable diseases in Ebola-affected countries.

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image: Elevated Measles Risk in Ebola-Stricken Regions

Elevated Measles Risk in Ebola-Stricken Regions

By | March 13, 2015

Decreased vaccination rates could lead to a deadlier measles outbreak, according to a study.

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image: Herpes Vax Shows Promise

Herpes Vax Shows Promise

By | March 12, 2015

A vaccine candidate against herpes simplex virus type 2 provides complete protection against infection in mice, with no evidence of latent virus.

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image: Facing Down Emerging Viruses

Facing Down Emerging Viruses

By | February 1, 2015

A better knowledge of the pathogenesis of emerging zoonotic diseases is crucial if we want to prepare for “the next Ebola.”

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image: Ebola Update

Ebola Update

By | January 26, 2015

Vaccine trial to start in Liberia as early as next week; trial for experimental therapy also planned, but production is still limited

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image: Toward a Cocaine Vaccine

Toward a Cocaine Vaccine

By | January 22, 2015

A modified bacterial protein elicits a robust immune response against a cocaine-linked molecule in mice.

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image: Ebola Update

Ebola Update

By | January 12, 2015

Researchers gear up for efficacy trials of experimental Ebola vaccines in Africa.

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image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

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image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

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