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image: Updating the Polio Vaccine

Updating the Polio Vaccine

By | January 4, 2016

Researchers develop new attenuated viruses that could support the eradication effort.

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image: All Together Now

All Together Now

By | January 1, 2016

Understanding the biological roots of cooperation might help resolve some of the biggest scientific challenges we face.

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image: Contributors


By | January 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2016 issue of The Scientist.


image: Inventing Teamwork

Inventing Teamwork

By | January 1, 2016

What can social networks among hunter-gatherers in Tanzania teach us about how cooperation evolved in human populations?


image: To Retain a Brain

To Retain a Brain

By | January 1, 2016

Exceptional neural fossil preservation helps answer questions about ancient arthropod evolution.

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image: Maintaining Cooperation

Maintaining Cooperation

By | January 1, 2016

How organisms keep their biological partners from cheating


image: Ancient Irish

Ancient Irish

By | December 30, 2015

The genomes of a 5,200-year-old woman and three 4,000-year-old men yield clues about the founding of Celtic populations.


image: Dog Origins Disputed

Dog Origins Disputed

By | December 17, 2015

A genomic study suggests that dogs diverged from wolves in Southeast Asia 33,000 years ago, contrary to reports placing their origins elsewhere on the continent.


image: When the Flu Vax Fails

When the Flu Vax Fails

By | December 16, 2015

The status of a person’s immune system can predict when a seasonal flu vaccination will not provide sufficient protection, according to a study. 


image: Constant Evolution

Constant Evolution

By | December 16, 2015

Bacteria growing in an unchanging environment continue to adapt indefinitely.


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