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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2015

The Genealogy of a Gene, On the Move, The Chimp and the River, and Domesticated

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Follow the Funding

By | May 1, 2015

In times of budget belt-tightening at the federal level, life-science researchers can keep their work supported through private sources.  

9 Comments

image: Targeted Information in the Rat Brain

Targeted Information in the Rat Brain

By | April 30, 2015

A study shows that the hippocampus selects which information to send, and where, during different behaviors.

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image: One-Man Tinnitus Map

One-Man Tinnitus Map

By | April 26, 2015

Researchers probe the neural roots of the ear-ringing condition in a man undergoing brain surgery.

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image: Study: Peer Review Predicts Success

Study: Peer Review Predicts Success

By | April 23, 2015

Scientists who evaluate National Institutes of Health grant applications often identify the projects that will have the biggest scientific impact, according to an analysis.

10 Comments

image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

1 Comment

image: Why DBS Works for Parkinson’s?

Why DBS Works for Parkinson’s?

By | April 14, 2015

Deep-brain stimulation may effectively treat slow movement, tremor, and rigidity in Parkinson’s patients by reducing synchronicity of neural activity in the motor cortex.

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image: A Spider's Eye View

A Spider's Eye View

By | April 1, 2015

Cornell researchers probe the brains of jumping spiders to gain insight into the arachnid's visual processing capabilities.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Through a Spider’s Eyes

Through a Spider’s Eyes

By | April 1, 2015

Deciphering how a jumping spider sees the world and processes visual information may yield insights into long-standing robotics problems.

2 Comments

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